K. Davis Olympic Games Tokyo 2020

Olympic gold is once again within reach for Keyshawn Davis. Five months after the highly anticipated lightweight turned professional in the midst of controversy with the national governing organisation, Davis and two other American boxers were awarded spots in the Tokyo Olympics on Monday, allowing Davis to make an improbable return to USA Boxing.

K. Davis Olympic Games Tokyo 2020

K. Davis Olympic Games Tokyo 2020

Davis, 22, is one of the favourites in the 63-kilogram class in Tokyo after winning his first three professional fights in the past three and a half months.

After a chaotic Olympic qualification procedure brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, the United States will be sending five men to Tokyo, with Davis, featherweight Duke Ragan, and middleweight Troy Isley joining the team. Davis is the leading male contender for a gold medal on the team.

Two Men and Four Women Failed to Make the initial Cut, But the United States Now has Nine Competitors Headed to Tokyo.

Davis may not understand what happened, but he is thrilled to be back in his USA Boxing gear as the team finishes up its final training camp at a deserted Colorado Springs department store.

“I did not expect this at all when I became pro,” Davis said to The Associated Press. I had no intention of returning to the novice ranks. I was relieved by my choice. That’s right, I was one happy boxer.

I’d be my own boss, set my own hours, and go wherever I pleased, all while making a comfortable living. But when the Olympic Games came calling again, returning was an easy decision.

Thanks to regulation changes instituted before the Rio de Janeiro Games, professional prizefighters are now eligible to compete in the Olympic field, and Davis, Ragan, and Isley are among a still-unknown number of boxers who will be able to fight in Tokyo after going pro.

Pros travelling to Tokyo are virtually solely young talents like Davis, who gained a head start on their professional careers while keeping prepared for Olympic competition, putting to rest initial concerns about an infusion of seasoned veterans fighting amateurs.

Ragan is undefeated as a professional after just one year, whereas Isley has only fought once. Due to the postponed Americas qualification in Buenos Aires, neither fighter was initially chosen to compete in Tokyo.

Due to the pandemic and the chaos at the top of amateur boxing, qualification for the Olympics has become a mere recognition of past achievements. Among the top-ranked boxers from the Americas who didn’t make the cut for the initial continental allotment, Davis, Ragan, and Isley were given berths.

Davis Explained that he had to Miss the Workouts Because he had to Take Care of his Sick Mother.

Davis joked that he received the letter from USA Boxing announcing his dismissal from the squad “on Christmas Eve” as a result of the ongoing conflicts.

Billy Walsh, head coach of the USA Boxing team, admits that he and Davis had a falling out, but that they have made up and agreed to move on.

Walsh remarked, “We’ve put the team back together again.” “This is the team I envisioned having a few years back when we were plotting to be among the top teams at the Olympic Games. Davis has returned, and his outlook has brightened considerably. He has always worked well with others. The team’s morale has been greatly improved thanks to him.

Last month, just days before his fight on the undercard of Canelo lvarez’s victory over Billy Joe Saunders in Texas, Davis learnt about the potential of travelling to Tokyo. He was taken aback by the call from Walsh and USA Boxing’s head of high performance, Matt Johnson.

Last Words

Davis gladly agreed to hold off on becoming pro until June 19, when he was set to fight on the undercard of lightweight champion Teofimo Lopez’s main event versus George Kambosos Jr.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here